Water Catchment made Easy + Purification on the Cheap

DALLAS, : A stock pond south of Dallas, TX, dries up due to drought conditions 25 July. Nineteen consecutive days over 100 degrees and a withering drought prompted President Clinton to declare Texas an agricultural disaster area. AFP PHOTO/PAUL BUCK (Photo credit should read PAUL BUCK/AFP/Getty Images)
DALLAS, : A stock pond south of Dallas, TX, dries up due to drought conditions 25 July. Nineteen consecutive days over 100 degrees and a withering drought prompted President Clinton to declare Texas an agricultural disaster area. AFP PHOTO/PAUL BUCK (Photo credit should read PAUL BUCK/AFP/Getty Images)

Last week I wrote about how your water sucks. Now let’s talk about solutions.

One inch rain on a 1,000 square foot roof produces more than 600 gallons of run-off. Right now it’s running into your gutter. Catch it, purify it and use it.

Below is a number of different systems. They go from simple builds that you can finish in an afternoon, to involved systems that can catch and hold hundreds of gallons.

This water catchment system was shared by Desean Moore, who follows the blog.

The video keeps it short and sweet. Although its overall design is similar to the other systems, it does differ a little bit. It is the first time I’ve seen the use of the cut off bucket as the hole  for the downspout. That little detail looks like it might make for a tighter fit.

This is the video that Desean said he used when he built a water catchment on his own house, by the way.

This water catchment system goes into a bit greater detail.

The video features one of those calm dudes with a soothing and vaguely enthusiastic voice. He lays everything out, showing the parts and holding them us as he names them. This is important for brothers like me who don’t hang out at Home Depot.

He also includes useful tips, such as the one where he wraps the end of a hockey stick with duct tape so that he can lower a part into the inside of the rain barrel. He’s from Canada, by the way, where hockey sticks are common.

 

 

This video actually features a scalable system that goes from two barrel, 100 gallon storage to twelve barrels.

There is no narrator to walk you through it, just directions and parts listed on the screen, accompanied by the soft sound of flowing water. It makes it very easy to develop your own parts list, and it shows how easy it would be to add onto an existing rain barrel.

This is a gravity bio-water filter.

What did you think that you were going to do with all of that water? Use it in your garden? That’s actually a good idea, but in theory, you should be able to purify the water by running it through layers of sand and gravel.

The sand creates a layer of slime, that is full of good bacteria. That good bacteria feeds on the harmful microbes that are in the water, and by the time the process is through, your janky rainwater should be good enough to drink.

I say should. Although I will definitely build this in the Spring, it will probably be more for “oh shit” scenarios than to augment my actual drinking water. I won’t drink it until it’s tested. You shouldn’t either.

 

Next week I’ll go into more purification systems, as well as digging deeper into the bio water.

Life isn’t getting any easier.

Stay tuned.

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