Plant a Secret Survival Garden – Doomsday Preppers Article – National Geographic Channel

…firearms are only one aspect of self-defense. It doesn’t matter how effective you are at defending your house and home, if you’re starving to death.

You might have noticed the 40 acres: Urban Farming tab on the top of the page.

You might also have noticed it’s been empty.

From the beginning, I’ve always believed that firearms are only one aspect of self-defense. It doesn’t matter how effective you are at defending your house and home, if you’re starving to death. And since we have been talking about the old ways, we have to talk about homesteading.

That isn’t my thing.

My plan was to turn my small backyard into a thriving garden, able to feed hundreds. How? I don’t know. I bought a cactus from the Philadelphia Flower Show once. Cactus are to plants as Hermit Crabs are to pets. Easy to maintain, and hard to kill. Mine turned brown and died within days.

Guns are easy. Practice and you’ll get better. Plants, however, aren’t.

The photo, courtesy of ejfood.blogspot.com, depicts an urban garden in the heart of Detroit. Self defense and self sufficiency isn't just about guns. Putting food on the table must be top priority.
The photo, courtesy of ejfood.blogspot.com, depicts an urban garden in the heart of Detroit. Self defense and self sufficiency isn’t just about guns. Putting food on the table must be top priority.

If you know an urban homesteader, let me know. I would love to have a contributor. Otherwise, I will be sharing other people’s content.
The following is from Rick Austin and was published on National Geographic in 2013. It’s about secret survival gardens, and it’s pretty interesting. Growing food has always seemed like a great use of public lands, especially if it doesn’t alter the landscape.

Next I’ll post something about seed bombs. Think of them as the DIY delivery system for secret gardens.

Photo of wild survival garden, courtesy of Rick Austin
Photo of wild survival garden, courtesy of Rick Austin

Imagine a garden that takes up very little space, but grows five times more food per square inch than a traditional garden. A garden that you plant once in your lifetime, but provides food for 30 years without any fertilization, pesticides, or weeding… and it’s all disguised to look like overgrown underbrush!

In a future world where there is potentially no electricity or refrigeration, no super markets or seed stores, and no fertilizers or pesticides, it makes sense to look at people who have managed to live successfully for generations without these “conveniences.” Studies of native indigenous people around the world—people who have lived off the land for generations without electricity, refrigeration, commercial agriculture, pesticides, or insecticides—showed that these people lived primarily on perennials (plants that grow year after year without replanting) as opposed to annuals such as typical grocery store vegetables (crops that must be replanted each year).

Simply put, perennials only have to be planted once and they will produce food for a lifetime, whereas garden vegetables have to be replanted year after year from seed. Because of the natural life-cycle of perennials, they have the time to put down deeper and longer roots, which makes them able to get more nutrients, reach water deeper in the soil, and makes them less susceptible to seasonal variations in sunshine, rainfall, cold and heat than an annual plant.

In nature, plants don’t grow in rows and don’t need to be cultivated, trimmed, weeded, or treated with pesticides. Yet nature has been growing fruits, nuts, berries and herbs successfully for millions of years without man’s help. In fact, many plants often maintain symbiotic relationships where each plant benefits by being with the other. Our Secret Garden of Survival mimics the way that plants grow in nature. And in nature, plants grow together in three dimensions: some taller, some shorter, and they grow in a way where all plants get adequate sun, air, rain, and oftentimes share nutrients and benefit from natural pest control.

This photo from Rick Austin, author of "Secret Survival Garden", shows the different layers and zones of wild survival garden.
This photo from Rick Austin, author of “Secret Survival Garden”, shows the different layers and zones of wild survival garden.

Plants grown together in three dimensions. Plants in nature often grow in concentric circles where the tallest plant (often a fruit or nut tree) provides shade underneath it for shade-seeking plants, and outside of that shade, a layer of shrubs like blueberries and blackberries can grow. Outside of that circle of shrubs, herbs can grow. Herbs in this position have the added benefit of attracting insect pollinators as well as predatory wasps, which will feed on many of the “bad” bugs that would normally attack the fruit on the central tree and berry bushes. These herbs, in a way, provide a defensive perimeter around the fruit, nuts, and berries that bad bugs must cross at their own peril. Finally, around the herb layer is a lower level of ground cover, which often accumulates nitrogen (a natural fertilizer) that these plants take from the air, and make it available to the surrounding plants.

Because we are growing in three dimensions, we can produce five times more food in the same space that you would plant a traditional garden. And because these plants all grow together, and are in some cases intertwined, it does not look like a traditional garden, but instead looks “natural”—like overgrown underbrush, which camouflages the garden from marauders.

Mint, comfrey, mountain mint, cucumbers, beans, peanuts, oats and clover, all growing together in this 2×2 ft. square space.

One of the biggest benefits of this type of garden for preppers is that it is almost no work to maintain, compared to gardening with annual vegetables. And in a doomsday scenario, preppers are going to have enough work to do, without having to tend to a garden every day, while exposing themselves to potential enemies. Further, by planting primarily perennials- and a large variety of them- you will always have food for you and your family each year, no matter what the short term summer weather brings.

For more detailed information on how you can grow this kind of garden and get the book, go to Rick Austin’s website, SecretGardenOfSurvival.com Secret Garden of Survival-How to Grow a Camouflaged Food-Forest™ and Secret Garden of Survival™ are trademarks of Rick Austin and are used by permission. All photographs are copyright ©2012, Rick Austin. All rights reserved.